Physics is the study of how the universe works. This is certainly a very broad discipline. One can roughly break it down into the study of things that we observe with our human senses (Classical Mechanics – Newton), things that are very small (Quantum Mechanics – Schrodinger), things that move very fast (Relativistic Mechanics – Einstein), and things that are very small that also move very fast (Quantum Field Theory – Feynman).

High school physics and introductory college physics focus first on Classical Mechanics, which includes Mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, oscillations), E & M (electricity and magnetism), and some other selected topics (waves, fluids, thermodynamics, optics, etc.). One can gain deeper and deeper insights into classical mechanics, depending upon the level of math used. 

A first level of insight can be obtained with simply a foundation in Algebra I (a basic general physics high school course). One can go a little deeper with an understanding of Algebra II and right triangle trigonometry (an honors physics high school course or an introductory college physics course for non-scientists/engineers). And one can go deeper still by employing calculus (high school AP physics or introductory college physics for scientists and engineers).

In high school some teachers try to cover a very broad array of topics without much depth, and provide a broad overview of physics for their students. Others focus on fewer topics (mechanics … maybe a little E&M), and try to achieve a deeper conceptual understanding for their students. The latter approach seems to be what the colleges prefer for their incoming students.

This is where Aggieland Tutoring comes in. When you discover that your high school teacher didn’t teach the material the way your college professor is wanting you to know it we will fill in the gaps and keep you from falling behind.